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Wednesday, January 3

  1. page Mckechnie, Luther edited ... Keighley News report dated 30th September 1916: LEES AND CROSS ROADS ... youngest son, F…
    ...
    Keighley News report dated 30th September 1916:
    LEES AND CROSS ROADS
    ...
    youngest son,
    Fitter
    Fitter Luther McKechnie,
    ...
    February 1915,
    Fitter
    Fitter McKechnie was
    ...
    a boy,
    he
    he spent three
    ...
    St Dunstan's,
    subsequently
    subsequently proceeding to
    ...
    the Barrow
    Barrow
    Corporation for
    ...
    observant, and
    energetic,
    energetic, and a
    ...
    his officers
    and
    and men. His
    His
    eldest brother,
    ...
    and his
    late
    late brother-in-law, Lance
    (view changes)
    2:11 pm

Monday, November 27

  1. page Surr, CW edited ... He is buried in Scamblesby churchyard in Lincolnshire, his parents’ village since his father’s…
    ...
    He is buried in Scamblesby churchyard in Lincolnshire, his parents’ village since his father’s retirement from the police in 1911. His headstone also commemorates his brother-in-law John Henry Hitch, 1/Lancs Fusiliers, who was killed near Meteren in 1918, also from Keighley – both appear on the Ingrow war memorial.
    (History kindly provided by David Surr, Charlie's Great Nephew)
    Keighley News, Saturday January 22, 1916:
    DISTINCTIONS FOR LOCAL MEN.
    KEIGHLEY D.C.M. WINNERS.
    Bombardier Charles W. Surr, an Ingrow soldier, who is with the Royal Field Artillery in France, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. He was recommended for the distinction after the battle of Loos for repairing telephone wires in that engagement whilst under a heavy rifle fire, at great personal risk to himself. In a letter to his sister a fortnight ago he said he had been further recommended. but for what deed he did not know. Bombardier Surr is the son of ex - Police-Constable Surr, formerly of Riddlesden, and now living in retirement in Lincolnshire. He enlisted immediately after the outbreak of war, and went out to France about eight months ago. He is very well known in Keighley and District, and before his enlistment was in business as a grocer in Ingrow Lane. Almost three months ago he was at home on a short furlough.
    Keighley News, Saturday August 19, 1916:
    Bombardier C. W. Surr, Royal Field Artillery, who before enlistment was in business as a grocer in Ingrow Lane, Keighley, has been wounded in the knee, and admitted to hospital at Thorpe, Norwich. In September last he won the Distinguished Conduct medal for gallantry in the fighting around Loos.

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    11:29 pm
  2. page Surr, CW edited Bombardier Charles William Surr D.C.M. {Surr_CW.jpg} The eldest son of a policeman who left Lin…
    Bombardier Charles William Surr D.C.M.
    {Surr_CW.jpg}
    The eldest son of a policeman who left Lincolnshire to work in the West Riding 1887, Charlie Surr was a grocer in Ingrow who had been in the Territorials before the war.
    He enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery in the first week of September 1914, serving in A/52, 52nd Brigade RFA, 9th (Scottish) Divisional Artillery.
    The 9th Division was the first Kitchener division to be sent to France, in May 1915, and became a formation of considerable repute. Early days at Festubert, but played a key role at Loos in September, attacking the Hohenzollern Redoubt with some success. Charlie Surr was a signaller, and one of seven men decorated for maintaining communications between the infantry around Fosse 8 and detachments that had galloped to take up advanced positions near “The Dump”, an enormous flat-topped colliery slag heap, all under constant fire. They were ordered to Ypres immediately after, and faced Hill 60 until January 1916 when they occupied the Ploegsteert Wood sector.
    Dispatched to the Somme in June, the 9th Division infantry were in reserve for 1st July, but the artillery were in line at Maricourt supporting the successful attack of 30th & 18th Divisions towards Montauban. The signallers spent the next 3 weeks in a great many locations in and around Bernafay Wood, Trones Wood, Maltz Horn Farm and Longueval/Delville Wood, often in exposed positions with the infantry. Charlie was knee-capped by shrapnel on 18th July, the day of the main German counter attack on Delville Wood; he was evacuated through an excellent medical chain and spent months in recovery in hospitals in Norwich and Keighley. His wound however immobilized him and ended his war, and he spent the remainder in RGA signals offices in Edinburgh and London.
    He was officially awarded his DCM from Loos by King George V at Ibrox stadium in September 1917, a unique mass investiture of much precedence for British social history. He survived demobilization by only a couple of weeks, falling victim to pneumonia in June 1919.
    He is buried in Scamblesby churchyard in Lincolnshire, his parents’ village since his father’s retirement from the police in 1911. His headstone also commemorates his brother-in-law John Henry Hitch, 1/Lancs Fusiliers, who was killed near Meteren in 1918, also from Keighley – both appear on the Ingrow war memorial.
    (History kindly provided by David Surr, Charlie's Great Nephew)

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    11:25 pm

Saturday, November 25

  1. 1:10 pm
  2. page Scarborough, Robert E edited Robert E. Private Robert Eric Scarborough. TR5/38362. Training Yorkshire Regiment (Alexandr…
    Robert E.Private Robert Eric Scarborough. TR5/38362.
    Training

    Yorkshire Regiment (Alexandra, Princess of Wales' Own), 10th Training
    reserve battalion. Service number TR5/38362.
    {Scarborough_RobertE01.jpg} Picture from Keighley News Saturday 19th May 1917
    Name: SCARBOROUGH, ROBERT ERIC
    Rank: Private
    Regiment: Training Reserve
    Unit Text: 10th Bn.
    Age: 18
    Date
    Robert Eric Scarborough was born in Haworth on the thirtieth of Death: 12/05/1917
    Service No: TR5/38362
    Additional information: Son
    September 1898 and baptised in Haworth on the twenty-third of October in the same year. He was the son of Benjamin and M. E. Scarborough( nee Ratcliffe ) of 10, Fold West Lane, Haworth.TheMary Eleanor Scarborough. The Scarborough family were
    ...
    200 years.
    Casualty Type: Commonwealth
    Mary Eleanor was a confectioner and baker (on her own account).
    He was educated at Keighley Trade and Grammar School from 1912, having won a scholarship.
    Resident in Haworth when he enlisted at Keighley into the 15th battalion of Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own (Yorkshire Regiment)
    From 24th February to 3rd March 1917 he was at Rugeley Camp Stafford. 13th March, to Base camp.
    Robert died in the military hospital at Cannock Chase, whilst still in training. The cause of death given was cerebro-spinal fever and this was contracted in camp where an epidemic was prevalent. The base hospital report describes a typical clinical picture of CSF of the chronic type. Whilst in hospital he was treated by lumbar puncture and injection of serum. His condition did not improve and died at 5.15 am on 12th May 1917. He was eighteen years of age and is buried in Haworth (St Michael and All Angels) churchyard.
    His family were issued with a memorial plaque and scroll on 3rd May 1919.
    Robert is remembered in St Michaels Church on the Haworth Roll of Honour, on the Haworth
    War Dead
    Grave/Memorial Reference: In West part.
    Cemetery: HAWORTH (ST. MICHAEL) CHURCHYARD
    Family
    Memorial and on the Stanbury Roll of Honour and he is also remembered in the 'Keighlian' Magazine's Great War Roll of Honour.
    Keighlian Magazine obituary:
    ROBERT SCARBOROUGH.
    Private. 10th Training Reserve.
    Robert Scarborough came to the School in September, 1912, as winner of a Scott Scholarship. He left in July, 1915, and entered the services of Messrs. Thos. Cook & Son in their Keighley Office. From leaving the Day School to his entry into the Army he was regular in attendance in the Commercial Department of the Technical School and was considered to be a very promising student. He joined the Army on February 20th, 1917, but his career as a soldier was very brief as, after he had been at Rugeley Camp for one month only, he was taken ill with Cerebro-Spinal Fever and after lying in Cannock Chase Hospital for seven weeks he died on May 18th, 1917.
    Robert Scarborough was a young man who was liked by every one who knew him for his unassuming disposition and his cheerful presence. It was his misfortune to give himself for his country without being permitted to defend her on the field of battle, but Robert Scarborough would have done his duty with his fellows even at the same cost if the opportunity had been afforded him to do it. The Masters and boys of his Old School unite in sending their respectful sympathy to his parents and relations.
    Robert's grave:
    This is in the West part of the churchyard of St Michael and All Angels and his inscription
    reads: In"In loving memory
    {Scarborough_RE.02.jpg} Robert's grave in Haworth churchyard
    (view changes)
    4:07 am

Saturday, November 4

  1. page Spedding, William Henry edited Corporal William Henry Spedding 2nd/6th Battalion Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment. Serv…
    Corporal William Henry Spedding
    2nd/6th Battalion Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment. Service no. 265402.
    {Spedding, William Henry - CPGW image.jpg}
    William went missing on 3rd May 1917. An official decision was made early in 1918 that he was missing, presumed killed on that date.
    William was born in Gargrave in the early part of 1898, to parents Frederick Wilson Spedding and Maria Spedding. The birth was registered in Skipton in the second quarter of the year and he was baptised at St Andrew's Church in Gargrave on the first of September. When he was two years old his family was living at 32, River Place, Gargrave, and his father was a Coal Carter in the 1901 census. He had two sisters Lilian May aged four years, and Bertha Florence at eleven months.
    By 1911 they had moved to Lower Green in Gargrave and William was twelve years old and working half time as a cotton ring doffer and half time at school. At some point they moved to 3, Wren Street, Keighley and he enlisted for the Army in 1914 and was later described as one of 'Keighley's Gallant Sons', which listed early volunteers for the Great War. His address at this time was 17, Prospect Place. He would have been around sixteen years old and we assume they spotted he was under age, as he didn't go out to France until 1917, when he would have been nineteen. Prior to joining the colours he worked for Hall & Stells of Keighley.
    He wasn't in France for more than a few months before he was killed in action on 3rd May, the day he went missing and failed to answer roll call.
    2/6 Battalion Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment. War Diary entry for 3rd May 1917:
    MORY 2/5/17 9pm
    H.90 A & B Coys under Lt Col S W Ford proceeded to the Railway Embankment at U.26.c.70 in order to take part in an attack which the 62nd Division was making at 3:40 am on the 3rd May 1917 on BULLECOURT (FRANCE SHEET 51B SW4) & trenches of the HINDENBURG LINE West of BULLECOURT at map reference: U.26.c.7.0.
    3/5/17. 10 pm. The Battalion suffered severe losses during the attack on this date. Casualties: Officers. 1 killed, 5 wounded, 3 missing, Other ranks: Killed, 15. Wounded, 155. Missing, 88.
    The authorities must have gone through various channels to try to find out if he had been taken prisoner by the Germans, or had been wounded and was lying in a hospital somewhere, but finally they had to take the decision that he had been killed in action.
    Keighley News dated 23rd February 1918, page 3:
    Corporal W. H. Spedding, of 3, Wren Street, Keighley, was reported missing from May 3 last, is now reported killed. He joined the West Riding Regiment in 1914, and went to France in 1917. He was formerly employed by Hall & Stell Ltd., Keighley.
    William Henry Spedding has no known final resting place, and his name is recorded in perpetuity on the Arras Memorial at Fauborg D'Amiens Cemetery.
    He is also remembered locally in Keighley's Great War Roll of Honour Book in Keighley Library.
    He was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medals for his war service.

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    2:33 pm

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